Braggin’ on my kid

We got our copy of the speech therapist’s report.  As measured by the test she did on his understanding of language (presumably the third of the three tests she did; for those who are interested, it’s apparently called the Reynell Developmental Language Skills 3), he understood language structures at the level of an average four and a half year old.  This puts him just over a year ahead of his chronological age in language comprehension.

<pause for smug smile>

Since Sidheag asked: it seems that the signs of autism she thought he was showing during the assessment were problems with his social interaction – reduced eye contact and ‘tendencies not to initiate social interaction or shared play’.  She also wrote, however, that his intellect will enable him to learn appropriate social behaviours and conversation over time.  Which is pretty much what I think, as well (hey, it worked for me…)  She’s going to liaise with the nursery about using something called the Early Years Toolkit for social and communication difficulties, and get a colleague of hers who visits children at nurseries to do a repeat assessment in the autumn term.  I shall look forward to seeing what further complimentary things are said at that point about my brilliant son.

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4 Comments

Filed under Here Be Offspring, How quickly they grow up

4 responses to “Braggin’ on my kid

  1. Sidheag

    Always nice when people recognise the natural brilliance of one’s offspring 🙂 Someone else asked a while ago, and I thought it was a great question, whether his squint and the patching for it might possibly have affected the extent to which he makes eye contact (e.g., by making it not seem to him like a natural thing to do when he was tiny). Is that something you’ve talked to anyone about?

  2. Granny Constance

    I am interested in Sideag’s question and although I anticipate that the answer will be a “shoot from the hip” no from professionals on the basis that patching and visual problems do not generally result in autistic spectrum disorders. On the other hand I do think Sideag may have something here. My hunch is that there are a number of interactive developmental issues going on many of which may well right themselves over time given the careful monitoring and sensitive support that I know his parents will provide. For a long time with his squint he seemed to me to have double vision though it is difficult to say why exactly I thought this at the time. I used to try seeing if he would follow my finger and his response was somehow different from other children I have had close contact with. On top of this he had a history of severe feeding problems over a couple of months at the outset with the result that time he would have spent looking round and generally feeling part of things and interacting was spent in almost non stop breast feeding when he faced into the breast with little eye contact.
    All of this is speculation, of course. What I am certain about is that he will learn social skills and start to find the pleasure and joy of other people, their delights, quirks individualities and constant surprises. I am very confident in Jamie’s future especially given his parents’ love and skill. Sarah, I am proud of you. XX Granny C

  3. Granny Constance

    I am interested in Sideag’s question and although I anticipate that the answer will be a “shoot from the hip” no from professionals on the basis that patching and visual problems do not generally result in autistic spectrum disorders. On the other hand I do think Sideag may have something here. My hunch is that there are a number of interactive developmental issues going on many of which may well right themselves over time given the careful monitoring and sensitive support that I know his parents will provide. For a long time with his squint he seemed to me to have double vision though it is difficult to say why exactly I thought this at the time. I used to try seeing if he would follow my finger and his response was somehow different from other children I have had close contact with. On top of this he had a history of severe feeding problems over a couple of months at the outset with the result that time he would have spent looking round and generally feeling part of things and interacting was spent in almost non stop breast feeding when he faced into the breast with little eye contact.
    All of this is speculation, of course. What I am certain about is that he will learn social skills and start to find the pleasure and joy of other people, their delights, quirks individualities and constant surprises. I am very confident in Jamie’s future especially given his parents’ love and skill. Sarah, I am proud of you. XX Granny C

  4. Ruth

    he’s so clever and brilliant. Well done Jamie!
    Love proud auntie Ruth xx

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